That Absurd Entity, Poetry – Polish Translations of Marianne Moore’s Ars Poetica of the Moment

That Absurd Entity, Poetry – Polish Translations of Marianne Moore’s Ars Poetica of the Moment

Only bad writers find constant pleasure in writing; truly great authors have at least occasional fits of creative self-doubt.

On the other hand, it is well known that about two out of every thousand people enjoy reading poetry – not counting poets themselves. It is not a majority, but a minority, among the population as a whole, that likes poetry. But poets do belong to that minority.

For her part, Marianne Moore (1887-1972), American modernist poet and literary critic, editor of the prestigious literary and cultural The Dial in the 1920s, was inclined to declare her solidarity with those who have no taste for poetry. “I, too, dislike it,” she openly admitted in her famous poem entitled “Poetry”; there are other things more important than this absurdity. But even while feeling an exquisite disdain or “perfect contempt” for poetry, Moore continues, she has to admit that it remains a place for what is authentic and true, what is firmly grounded in reality – or, as she calls it in the poem, “the genuine”:

Marianne Moore, Poetry

I, too, dislike it: there are things that are important beyond all this fiddle.
   Reading it, however, with a perfect contempt for it, one discovers in
   it after all, a place for the genuine. […] [1]

However, “the genuine,” that which poetry might contain, is not defined by Moore. Instead of a definition, we find in her poem, immediately following the provocative (coming from a poet’s lips) opening statement, a long list of intensely varied objects: “Hands that can grasp, eyes / that can dilate, hair that can rise / if it must […] the immovable critic twitching his skin like a horse that feels a flea […].” All of these no doubt ought to be included in the catalogue of “things that are important beyond all this fiddle,” poetry, which nevertheless, if we believe in its referentiality, as Moore does, could contain those things. “One must make a distinction, however,” the poet clarifies: “when dragged into prominence by half poets, the result is not poetry […].” Poetry only begins to exist when poets become “literalists of the imagination” and will be capable of presenting “imaginary gardens with real toads in them […].”

[…] In the meantime, if you demand on the one hand,
the raw material of poetry in
   all its rawness and
   that which is on the other hand
                   genuine, you are interested in poetry.[2]

As it turns out, this whole line of reasoning has been an experiment on Moore’s part, calculated to tie together threads of understanding: you find poetry to be a frivolous pursuit, reader? I understand. You make serious demands on it? I understand that perfectly, too. But that means that you are, in fact, interested in poetry, doesn’t it? So here, too, we are agreed. The provocative declaration “I, too, dislike it” displays the classical rhetorical technique of captatio benevolentiae, used in order to show the reader, once won over to the author’s side, her perspective on poetry – to give readers a short lesson in normative poetics, arising in an ostensibly ad hoc manner for greater suggestiveness, right before their eyes, while the connection is still vital. Marianne Moore’s “Poetry” is thus an example of an ars poetica of the moment, which nonetheless does not mean that the estimated temporal horizon of its effect was meant to be limited to that moment.

According to Moore, poetry should create imagined worlds in such a way that the effect appears to be truer than reality. It ought to – because it has not yet done that, this is the task poets are faced with (this also offers a partial explanation of why the Complete Poems of such an ambitious poet fills a relatively slim volume, in terms of page numbers).

Moore’s tactic for getting the reader to pay close attention to her lecture on poetic art is quite sophisticated: she makes an understanding gesture towards those who do not like poetry without joining the camp of those who have contempt for it. She questions, but does not depreciate. Even if contemporary poetry is “fiddle,” meaning absurdity, nonsense, triviality – its potential is great, we understand if we read between the lines.

This strategy of questioning without contempt is performed in rather divergent ways in Polish translations of “Poetry.”

In his translation, Jarosław Marek Rymkiewicz refers to poetry (poezja) as “tym całym rzępoleniem” (all of this fiddling), treating “fiddle” as referring literally to the musical instrument – thus somewhat blurring the metaphoric meaning of “stupidity” (i.e., “fiddlesticks,” balderdash [although in English, the sense of literal “fiddling” as frivolity does have a precedent in the oft-repeated legend that Nero “fiddled while Rome burned”—T.D.W.]); “rzępolenie” is, in my view, a clumsy and rather lifeless choice:

Ja również nie gustuję w niej; są sprawy ważniejsze poza tym całym rzępoleniem.
   Jednakże czytając ją, z doskonałą wzgardą, odkrywamy tam
   miejsce na autentyzm, mimo wszystko. […] [3]

I, likewise, have no taste for it; there are matters more important beyond all this fiddling.
   Reading it, however, with perfect contempt, we discover there
   a place for authenticity, after all. […]

Jan Prokop chooses the same solution:

I ja także nie lubię jej. Są rzeczy ważniejsze niż to rzępolenie.
Gdy czytamy ją jednak z doskonałą pogardą można odkryć
tam
mimo wszystko miejsce na coś swoistego. […][4]

I don’t like it either. There are things more important than all that fiddling.
When we read it, though, with perfect contempt, we can discover
there
after all a place for something specific. […]

Julia Hartwig makes the decision to use the word “playthings” (again following the association with play), and weakened contempt to something more like disregard, with an additional “even”:

Ja także jej nie lubię: są rzeczy ważniejsze niż te wszystkie igraszki,
a jednak czytając ją, nawet z największym lekceważeniem, odkrywamy w niej,
mimo wszystko, miejsca prawdziwe. […][5]

I don’t like it either: there are things more important than all these playthings,
Yet reading it, even with highest disregard, we discover in it,
after all, true places.

Stanisław Barańczak chooses “bzdurzenie” (rot, drivel) and distaste rather than disliking:

Ja też czuję do niej niechęć: istnieją rzeczy ważne a całemu temu bzdurzeniu niedostępne.
   A jednak czytając, z kompletną wobec niej pogardą, odkrywa
   się w niej miejsce, gdzie może zaistnieć prawdziwa
                   rzecz. […][6]

I, too, feel a distaste for it: important things exist, beyond reach of all this rot.
   However, reading it, with complete contempt for it,
   places open up where there can exist a true
                   thing.

Ludmiła Marjańska, editor and co-translator of one collection of Polish translations of Moore’s poetry (Wiersze wybrane [Selected Poems], 1980), chose not to even attempt to translate this poem. She used an excerpt in her introduction, however, in order to illustrate how Moore strives for terseness: the American poet, Marjańska writes, “kept on correcting her poems, going back and eliminating whole paragraphs from them. The best example of this is the famous poem ‘Poetry,’ from which only three lines remain, from the original first verse:

Ja także jej nie znoszę.
A jednak, gdy człowiek ją czyta pełen pogardy, odkrywa,
jak niezwykła jest i prawdziwa.[7]

(I, too, can’t stand it.
Yet when a person reads it full of contempt, he discovers
how strange it is and true.)

The first three Polish translations I cited postulate a certain community of those who write and those who read, signaling it by using plural forms. In Rymkiewicz’s and Hartwig’s translations, this formula takes the following shape: reading poetry, with perfect contempt / with the highest disregard, we discover (…); whereas in Prokop’s version, the line reads: when we read poetry with perfect contempt, we can discover (…). Thus the poetic (or, to be precise, translating) persona admits to not only antipathy for poetry (as in the original: “I, too, dislike it”), but also to a contempt for it, shared with the reader.

The original, however, is more impersonal in the corresponding place: “Reading it, however, with a perfect contempt for it, one discovers… [.]” The deeply contemptuous unanimity of author and reader is far from obvious – the constructions with the pronoun “one” can be translated into Polish using the reflexive “odkrywa się” (here functioning as passive, “is discovered”) or even “można odkryć” (literally: “it is possible to discover”). The line is more a hypothesis, rather an attempt to adopt someone else’s point of view than an account of the speaker’s own readerly approach, identical with the impressions of others who nourish a perfect contempt for poetry.

This nuance is preserved in Barańczak’s version, where it reads: “A jednak czytając, z kompletną wobec niej [poezji] pogardą, odkrywa / się w niej miejsce, gdzie może zaistnieć prawdziwa / rzecz” (However, reading it, with complete contempt for it, places / are discovered where there can exist a true / thing). Both of the enjambments, “odkrywa / się” and “prawdziwa / rzecz” can be recognized as trademarks of the translator’s style – like the rhyme “odkrywa – prawdziwa” (to which there is no equivalent in the original) in Marjańska’s version. Marjańska, though her translation begins with the strong declaration: “nie znoszę jej” (I … can’t stand it), later writes with greater detachment: “gdy człowiek ją czyta pełen pogardy, odkrywa…” (when a person reads it full of contempt, he discovers…). Thus, not even every reader, but only those who are “full of contempt,” which further narrows the circle of like-minded readers – the absence of a comma changes the meaning enough to give the impression of being a conscious omission. What is more, in this translation poetry “strange… is and true” – it already is those things, as opposed to having the potential to become them, as Moore would have it. Marjańska’s translation is even more affirmative than Julia Hartwig’s version, according to which in poetry “we discover… after all, true places.” These Polish female translators’ belief in poetry is more absolute than that of the poem’s author.

Moore’s experiment has one blind spot: will someone who not only does not like poetry, but thinks of it with total disdain, go to the trouble of picking up a book of poems and reading this manifesto of the moment?

Appendix

Marianne Moore, Poetry

I, too, dislike it: there are things that are important beyond all this fiddle.
   Reading it, however, with a perfect contempt for it, one discovers in
   it after all, a place for the genuine.
                   Hands that can grasp, eyes
                   that can dilate, hair that can rise
                                   if it must, these things are important not because a

high-sounding interpretation can be put upon them but because they are
   useful. When they become so derivative as to become unintelligible,
   the same thing may be said for all of us, that we
                   do not admire what
                   we cannot understand: the bat
                                   holding on upside down or in quest of something to

eat, elephants pushing, a wild horse taking a roll, a tireless wolf under
   a tree, the immovable critic twitching his skin like a horse that feels a flea, the base-
   ball fan, the statistician–
                   nor is it valid
                                   to discriminate against “business documents and

school-books”; all these phenomena are important. One must make a distinction
   however: when dragged into prominence by half poets, the result is not poetry,
   nor till the poets among us can be
                   “literalists of
                   the imagination” – above
                                   insolence and triviality and can present

for inspection, “imaginary gardens with real toads in them,” shall we have
   it. In the meantime, if you demand on the one hand,
   the raw material of poetry in
                   all its rawness and
                   that which is on the other hand
                                   genuine, you are interested in poetry.

From Selected Poems, 1935

Marianne Moore, Poezja

przeł. Jarosław Marek Rymkiewicz

Ja również nie gustuję w niej; są sprawy ważniejsze poza tym całym rzępoleniem.
Jednakże czytając ją, z doskonałą wzgardą, odkrywamy tam
miejsce na autentyzm, mimo wszystko.
   Ręce zdolne chwytać, oczy
   zdolne rozszerzać się, włos który może się zjeżyć,
   jeśli musi, są to rzeczy ważne nie dlatego, że
górnobrzmiąca interpretacja może im zostać przypisana, lecz z powodu ich
   użyteczności. A gdy stają się tak podobne, że aż niezrozumiałe, wtedy
o nas wszystkich można by rzec to samo: my
   nie będziemy zachwycać się tym,
   czego nie możemy pojąć: nietoperzem,
   wiszącym głową w dół lub słoniami pospieszającymi w
poszukiwaniu jakiegoś pożywienia, skokiem dzikiego konia, nieznużonym wilkiem pod
   drzewem, niewzruszonym krytykiem z drgającą skórą konia
   który czuje pchłę, uderzeniem
   w palancie, statystykiem –
   i nie jest przekonywające
   rozróżnienie „wbrew handlowym dokumentom i
podręcznikom”; wszystkie te fenomeny są istotne. Trzeba
   uczynić różnicę,
   jednakże; wyciągnięty na wzniesienie przez
   pół-poetów, wynik nie bywa poezją;
ani też, póki poeci między nami mogą być
   „zapisywaczami
   wyobraźni”, ponad
   bezczelnością i trywialnością, i mogą przedstawiać
do wglądu urojone ogrody z rzeczywistymi ropuchami,
   nie będziemy mieli
   jej. Tymczasem, jeśli żądacie, z jednej strony,
   naturalnego materiału poezji w całej
   jego naturalności i,
   z drugiej strony, tego co jest
   autentyczne, obchodzi was poezja.

Marianne Moore, Poezja

przeł. Jan Prokop

I ja także nie lubię jej. Są rzeczy ważniejsze niż to rzępolenie.
Gdy czytamy ją jednak z doskonałą pogardą można odkryć
tam
mimo wszystko miejsce na coś swoistego.
Ręce, które mogą schwytać, oczy,
które mogą się rozszerzyć, włosy, które mogą zjeżyć się,
gdy muszą, oto rzeczy ważne nie ze względu na
patetyczną interpretację możliwą do wczytania w nie, ale
ponieważ są
użyteczne. Gdy stają się tak oderwane, że aż niezrozumiałe,
jest tak samo jak z nami –
zachwycamy się tym, czego
nie pojmujemy: nietoperzem
gdy wisi głową w dół albo goni w
poszukiwaniu jedzenia, słoniem przy pracy, dzikim źrebcem i kręcącym
się w kółko, czujnym
wilkiem pod
drzewem, beznamiętnym krytykiem gdy marszczy skórę jak
koń nękany przez pchły, piłki
nożnej kibicem, profesorem statystyki –
nie można też
występować przeciw „dokumentom handlowym i
podręcznikom szkolnym”; wszystkie te rzeczy są istotne. Tym
niemniej trzeba dokonać rozróżnienia:
kiedy są wydobyte przez półpoetów,
rezultatem nie jest poezja,
nie będziemy też, zanim poeci wśród nas nauczą się być
wiernymi tłumaczami
wyobraźni (ponad zuchwałą trywialnością) i zdołają przedstawić
do wglądu ogrody wyobraźni z rzeczywistymi żabami w nich
mieć jej
naprawdę. Tymczasem jeśli czekamy, z jednej strony
na surowy materiał poetycki w
całej jego surowości, a
z drugiej na to, co
jej własne, wtedy lubimy poezję.

Marianne Moore, Poezja

przeł. Julia Hartwig

Ja także jej nie lubię: są rzeczy ważniejsze niż te wszystkie igraszki,
a jednak czytając ją, nawet z największym lekceważeniem, odkrywamy w niej,
mimo wszystko, miejsca prawdziwe.
Ręce, które mogą chwytać, źrenice,
które mogą się rozszerzać, włosy jeżące się
bezwiednie. Wszystkie te rzeczy ważne są nie dlatego,
że nadają się do szumnych komentarzy, ale ponieważ są

użyteczne. Kiedy stają się czymś oderwanym i przestają być zrozumiałe
można o nich powiedzieć zgodnie, że trudno nam
podziwiać to,
czego nie rozumiemy: nietoperza
wiszącego głową w dół lub poszukującego

żeru, napierających słoni, tarzającego się po ziemi mustanga, niezmordowanego wilka
pod drzewem, chłodnego krytyka otrząsającego się jak koń kąsany przez pchłę, fanatyka
base-ballu, statystyka –
niesłusznie też byłoby
gardzić „dokumentami służbowymi
i podręcznikami szkolnymi”; wszystkie te zjawiska mają swoją wagę. Trzeba jednak [wprowadzić

rozróżnienie: kiedy opiewają je pół-poeci, nie ma poezji
nie będzie jej, dopóki pewni poeci spośród nas nie opowiedzą się
za „dosłownością
wyobraźni” – ponad
prostactwem i pospolitością, udostępniając nam

do oglądania „zmyślone ogrody z żywymi ropuchami”.
Ten jednak, kto żąda
surowca poezji

w całej jego surowości
i zarazem całej jego prawdy,
ten bliski jest poezji.

Marianne Moore, Poezja

przeł. Stanisław Barańczak

Ja też czuję do niej niechęć: istnieją rzeczy ważne a całemu temu bzdurzeniu niedostępne.
   A jednak czytając, z kompletną wobec niej pogardą, odkrywa
   się w niej miejsce, gdzie może zaistnieć prawdziwa
                   rzecz. Dłonie zdolne do chwytania, oczy
                   potrafiące wyjść na wierzch, jeżący
                                   się – jeśli trzeba – włos: te rzeczy są ważne nie dlatego, że

można do nich doczepić jakąś górnolotną interpretację, ale ponieważ są
   do czegoś przydatne. Gdy oddalą się od swych źródeł tak, że tracą zrozumiałość,
   reagujemy chyba wszyscy tak samo:
                   nie możemy pojąć, toteż
                   nie podziwiamy. Nietoperz
                                   wiszący długo głową w dół albo mknący w poszukiwaniu

żeru, przepychanki słoni, tarzający się mustang, niezmordowany wilk
   pod drzewem, niewzruszony krytyk, któremu skóra drga jak koniowi,
   gdy czuje pchłę, kibic baseballowy,
                   statystyk –
                   tych rzeczywistych
                                   zjawisk, włącznie z „księgami handlowymi i podręcznikami”,

nie należy traktować jako mniej istotnych; wszystkie są ważne. Trzeba
                jednak wprowadzić rozróżnienie: jeśli w tę ważność wloką je na siłę
                pół-poeci, nie powstaje z tego poezja; i nie jest też możliwe
                                jej powstanie, dopóki poeci wśród nas nie będą się starali
                                być „literali-
                                                stami wyobraźni”, wyższymi niż wyniosłość i pospolitość,
dopóki nie będą umieli udostępnić naszym oczom „zmyślonych ogrodów,
                gdzie skaczą żywe ropuchy”. Na razie zaś, jeśli
                domagasz się, z jednej strony, surowca poezji
                                w całej jego dotkliwej
                                namacalności a, z drugiej, tego, co prawdziwe –
                                                chodzi ci właśnie o poezję.

translated by Timothy Williams

Przejdź do polskiej wersji artykułu

A b s t r a c t :

This essay combining literary history and translation criticism focuses on “Poetry,” the programmatic poem by outstanding American modernist poet Marianne Moore. It draws the reader’s attention to the most important interpretative issues in the work, including the poet’s attempt to enunciate the basically “inexpressible” essence of poetry and phenomenon of its functioning. The mystery of poetry and of Moore’s poem are illustrated through a critical analysis of Polish translations by the following translators: Jarosław Mark Rymkiewicz, Jan Prokop, Julia Hartwig, Stanisław Barańczak, and Ludmiła Marjańska, which are provided in an appendix together with the original.


[1]Marianne Moore, “Poetry,” in: Complete Poems. Faber and Faber, London 1967, 266-267.

[2]Loc. cit.

[3]Marianne Moore, “Poezja” (Poetry). Trans. Jarosław Marek Rymkiewicz. Tygodnik Powszechny (Universal Weekly)1958, 48, 5.

[4] Moore, “Poezja.” Trans. Jan Prokop. Tygodnik Powszechny 1961, 22, 5.

[5]Moore, “Poezja.” Trans. Julia Hartwig. In: Marianne Moore, Wiersze wybrane (Selected Poems). Edited and with an introduction by Ludmiła Marjańska. Translated by Julia Hartwig and Ludmiła Marjańska. Państwowy Instytut Wydawniczy, Warszawa 1980, 99.

[6] Moore, “Poezja.” Trans. Stanisław Barańczak. Im: Od Chaucera do Larkina. 400 nieśmiertelnych wierszy 125 poetów anglojęzycznych z 8 stuleci. Antologia w wyborze, przekładzie i opracowaniu Stanisława Barańczaka (From Chaucer to Larkin. 400 Immortal Poems by 125 English-Language Poets from 8 Centuries. Anthology Selected, Edited, and Translated by Stanisław Barańczak). Wydawnictwo Znak, Kraków 1993, 457.

[7] Ludmiła Marjańska, Słowo wstępne (Introduction). In: Marianne Moore, Wiersze wybrane (Selected Poems), 14. From the version of “Poetry” included in The Complete Poems Moore later deleted a dozen or so lines, including the reference to the absurdity of poetry. The entire poem in its revised version reads: “I, too, dislike it. / Reading it, however, with a perfect contempt for it, one discovers in / it, after all, a place for the genuine.” “Omissions are not accidents,” Moore wrote on the dedication page of her complete works; she included the earlier version in a footnote, however. See Marianne Moore, The Complete Poems, 36, 266-267.